Feature Image

Ocean/iStockPhoto

April 11, 2016. Water / Oceans

Why Are Oceans So Fascinating?

What makes oceans so fascinating is that they speak of us. They speak of our origins and the first miracles of photosynthesis that led to the appearance of life on our planet

Cristina G. Mittermeier, Gregory S. Stone, Russell A. Mittermeier, Octavio Aburto-Oropeza, Claudio Campagna, Kent E. Carpenter, Laurence P. Madin, David Obura, Enric Sala, Sebastian Troëng, Peter A. Seligman & Stefan Gutermuth

What makes oceans so fascinating is that they speak of us. They speak of our origins and the first miracles of photosynthesis that led to the appearance of life on our planet.

They also evoke the primitive animals that gradually moved out of the water to occupy dry land. They remind us that the marine element has always punctuated the history of humankind, just as it has defined our boundaries and harboured our dreams.

In man’s history every major step has corresponded to a new mastery of the seas. But the last few decades have witnessed a reversal in the balance of power.

We often forget that the oceans remain the indispensable source of life for us all and the generator of its great equilibria. No future is conceivable for humankind if it is not built on respect for the oceans.

This is why conservation of the seas is so important and also why it is so daunting.

We need to improve our knowledge and share it widely with our fellows to make everyone understand the urgency of concerted sustainable global action, in a spirit of harmony with the elements that shape our existence.

 

This is an excerpt from the CEMEX Conservation Series Book Oceans: Heart of Our Blue Planet (2011)

oceans-big

Oceans

Heart of our Blue Planet

buy book